Research Discussion: More Reasons There Are No Aliens Here

More Reasons There Are No Aliens Here
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HVAC
2010-02-18 05:40:50 EST

A US boffin has effectively put the mockers on Star Trek-style warp
speed travel to the stars by warning that interstellar hydrogen gas
would become deadly to humans as they approached the speed of light.

Professor William Edelstein of the Johns Hopkins University School of
Medicine explained to New Scientist that while interstellar space has
just a couple of hydrogen atoms per cubic centimetre, as the crew of
the Enterprise hit the gas pedal, a compression effect would greatly
increase the number of atoms hitting the spacecraft.

As the spaceship reached 99.999998 per cent of the speed of light,
"hydrogen atoms would seem to reach a staggering 7 teraelectron
volts", which for the crew "would be like standing in front of the
Large Hadron Collider beam".

This is a very bad thing, because humans in the path of this ray would
receive a dose of ionising radiation of 10,000 sieverts, and as Bones
McCoy would doubtless confirm, the lethal dose is 6 sieverts.

The result? Death in one second.

The spacecraft's structure would do little to mitigate the effects of
the killer hydrogen. Edelstein "calculates that a 10-centimetre-thick
layer of aluminium would absorb less than 1 per cent of the energy",
and the intense doses of radiation would damage the ship's structure
and fry its electronics.

Edelstein grimly concluded: "Hydrogen atoms are unavoidable space
mines."

The professor presented his killer calculations to an American
Physical Society meeting in Washington DC on Saturday.
Bootnote

Of course, Edelstein's conclusions are based on current scientific
knowledge. No doubt future spacecraft designers will deploy advanced
radiation-resistant alloys and magnetic shielding to protect
Federation staff from instant death.


Ben Kaufman
2010-02-18 07:14:56 EST
On Thu, 18 Feb 2010 02:40:50 -0800 (PST), HVAC <mr.hvac@gmail.com> wrote:
<SNIP>

>Of course, Edelstein's conclusions are based on current scientific
>knowledge. No doubt future spacecraft designers will deploy advanced
>radiation-resistant alloys and magnetic shielding to protect
>Federation staff from instant death.

Of course, Warp Drive does not have this problem. He might as well have
calculated the theoretical top end speed of an automobile based upon a Ford
Model T. :-)

Ben

Brad Guth
2010-02-18 09:47:51 EST
On Feb 18, 2:40 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
> A US boffin has effectively put the mockers on Star Trek-style warp
> speed travel to the stars by warning that interstellar hydrogen gas
> would become deadly to humans as they approached the speed of light.
>
> Professor William Edelstein of the Johns Hopkins University School of
> Medicine explained to New Scientist that while interstellar space has
> just a couple of hydrogen atoms per cubic centimetre, as the crew of
> the Enterprise hit the gas pedal, a compression effect would greatly
> increase the number of atoms hitting the spacecraft.
>
> As the spaceship reached 99.999998 per cent of the speed of light,
> "hydrogen atoms would seem to reach a staggering 7 teraelectron
> volts", which for the crew "would be like standing in front of the
> Large Hadron Collider beam".
>
> This is a very bad thing, because humans in the path of this ray would
> receive a dose of ionising radiation of 10,000 sieverts, and as Bones
> McCoy would doubtless confirm, the lethal dose is 6 sieverts.
>
> The result? Death in one second.
>
> The spacecraft's structure would do little to mitigate the effects of
> the killer hydrogen. Edelstein "calculates that a 10-centimetre-thick
> layer of aluminium would absorb less than 1 per cent of the energy",
> and the intense doses of radiation would damage the ship's structure
> and fry its electronics.
>
> Edelstein grimly concluded: "Hydrogen atoms are unavoidable space
> mines."
>
> The professor presented his killer calculations to an American
> Physical Society meeting in Washington DC on Saturday.
> Bootnote
>
> Of course, Edelstein's conclusions are based on current scientific
> knowledge. No doubt future spacecraft designers will deploy advanced
> radiation-resistant alloys and magnetic shielding to protect
> Federation staff from instant death.

So what? Use 10+ meters of aluminum or also incorporate another thick
layer of water as the shield against those nasty hydrogen and a few
other particles that pile up against the bow of your spacecraft.

Perhaps using an extended kind of leading nose or battering ram that
emitted trillions upon trillions of ions or positrons/s/cm2 would take
up most of the nasty hydrogen radiation, with the main ship following
a few km behind. That way you could easily go FTL. (those positrons
of antimatter pulling instead of pushing)

There now, I fixed everything.

As a whole we're already going .0025c towards The Great Attractor, and
lord only knows how fast the GA is going. According to some
(including that other crazy Guth guy), our universe has been expanding
itself in all directions at c.

~ BG

Double-A
2010-02-18 14:16:33 EST
On Feb 18, 2:40 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
> A US boffin has effectively put the mockers on Star Trek-style warp
> speed travel to the stars by warning that interstellar hydrogen gas
> would become deadly to humans as they approached the speed of light.
>
> Professor William Edelstein of the Johns Hopkins University School of
> Medicine explained to New Scientist that while interstellar space has
> just a couple of hydrogen atoms per cubic centimetre, as the crew of
> the Enterprise hit the gas pedal, a compression effect would greatly
> increase the number of atoms hitting the spacecraft.
>
> As the spaceship reached 99.999998 per cent of the speed of light,
> "hydrogen atoms would seem to reach a staggering 7 teraelectron
> volts", which for the crew "would be like standing in front of the
> Large Hadron Collider beam".
>
> This is a very bad thing, because humans in the path of this ray would
> receive a dose of ionising radiation of 10,000 sieverts, and as Bones
> McCoy would doubtless confirm, the lethal dose is 6 sieverts.
>
> The result? Death in one second.
>
> The spacecraft's structure would do little to mitigate the effects of
> the killer hydrogen. Edelstein "calculates that a 10-centimetre-thick
> layer of aluminium would absorb less than 1 per cent of the energy",
> and the intense doses of radiation would damage the ship's structure
> and fry its electronics.


Neutronium hull.


> Edelstein grimly concluded: "Hydrogen atoms are unavoidable space
> mines."
>
> The professor presented his killer calculations to an American
> Physical Society meeting in Washington DC on Saturday.
> Bootnote
>
> Of course, Edelstein's conclusions are based on current scientific
> knowledge. No doubt future spacecraft designers will deploy advanced
> radiation-resistant alloys and magnetic shielding to protect
> Federation staff from instant death.


No doubt.

Double-A


Double-A
2010-02-18 14:20:38 EST
On Feb 18, 6:47 am, Brad Guth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Feb 18, 2:40 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > A US boffin has effectively put the mockers on Star Trek-style warp
> > speed travel to the stars by warning that interstellar hydrogen gas
> > would become deadly to humans as they approached the speed of light.
>
> > Professor William Edelstein of the Johns Hopkins University School of
> > Medicine explained to New Scientist that while interstellar space has
> > just a couple of hydrogen atoms per cubic centimetre, as the crew of
> > the Enterprise hit the gas pedal, a compression effect would greatly
> > increase the number of atoms hitting the spacecraft.
>
> > As the spaceship reached 99.999998 per cent of the speed of light,
> > "hydrogen atoms would seem to reach a staggering 7 teraelectron
> > volts", which for the crew "would be like standing in front of the
> > Large Hadron Collider beam".
>
> > This is a very bad thing, because humans in the path of this ray would
> > receive a dose of ionising radiation of 10,000 sieverts, and as Bones
> > McCoy would doubtless confirm, the lethal dose is 6 sieverts.
>
> > The result? Death in one second.
>
> > The spacecraft's structure would do little to mitigate the effects of
> > the killer hydrogen. Edelstein "calculates that a 10-centimetre-thick
> > layer of aluminium would absorb less than 1 per cent of the energy",
> > and the intense doses of radiation would damage the ship's structure
> > and fry its electronics.
>
> > Edelstein grimly concluded: "Hydrogen atoms are unavoidable space
> > mines."
>
> > The professor presented his killer calculations to an American
> > Physical Society meeting in Washington DC on Saturday.
> > Bootnote
>
> > Of course, Edelstein's conclusions are based on current scientific
> > knowledge. No doubt future spacecraft designers will deploy advanced
> > radiation-resistant alloys and magnetic shielding to protect
> > Federation staff from instant death.
>
> So what?  Use 10+ meters of aluminum or also incorporate another thick
> layer of water as the shield against those nasty hydrogen and a few
> other particles that pile up against the bow of your spacecraft.
>
> Perhaps using an extended kind of leading nose or battering ram that
> emitted trillions upon trillions of ions or positrons/s/cm2 would take
> up most of the nasty hydrogen radiation, with the main ship following
> a few km behind.  That way you could easily go FTL. (those positrons
> of antimatter pulling instead of pushing)
>
> There now, I fixed everything.
>
> As a whole we're already going .0025c towards The Great Attractor, and
> lord only knows how fast the GA is going.  According to some
> (including that other crazy Guth guy), our universe has been expanding
> itself in all directions at c.
>
>  ~ BG


A high voltage electrical field could be projected in front of the
ship to ionize the atoms as they were encountered. then a powerful
magnetic field surrounding the ship would deflect them.

Double-A


Brad Guth
2010-02-18 15:38:48 EST
On Feb 18, 11:16 am, Double-A <double...@hush.com> wrote:
> On Feb 18, 2:40 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> > A US boffin has effectively put the mockers on Star Trek-style warp
> > speed travel to the stars by warning that interstellar hydrogen gas
> > would become deadly to humans as they approached the speed of light.
>
> > Professor William Edelstein of the Johns Hopkins University School of
> > Medicine explained to New Scientist that while interstellar space has
> > just a couple of hydrogen atoms per cubic centimetre, as the crew of
> > the Enterprise hit the gas pedal, a compression effect would greatly
> > increase the number of atoms hitting the spacecraft.
>
> > As the spaceship reached 99.999998 per cent of the speed of light,
> > "hydrogen atoms would seem to reach a staggering 7 teraelectron
> > volts", which for the crew "would be like standing in front of the
> > Large Hadron Collider beam".
>
> > This is a very bad thing, because humans in the path of this ray would
> > receive a dose of ionising radiation of 10,000 sieverts, and as Bones
> > McCoy would doubtless confirm, the lethal dose is 6 sieverts.
>
> > The result? Death in one second.
>
> > The spacecraft's structure would do little to mitigate the effects of
> > the killer hydrogen. Edelstein "calculates that a 10-centimetre-thick
> > layer of aluminium would absorb less than 1 per cent of the energy",
> > and the intense doses of radiation would damage the ship's structure
> > and fry its electronics.
>
> Neutronium hull.
>
> > Edelstein grimly concluded: "Hydrogen atoms are unavoidable space
> > mines."
>
> > The professor presented his killer calculations to an American
> > Physical Society meeting in Washington DC on Saturday.
> > Bootnote
>
> > Of course, Edelstein's conclusions are based on current scientific
> > knowledge. No doubt future spacecraft designers will deploy advanced
> > radiation-resistant alloys and magnetic shielding to protect
> > Federation staff from instant death.
>
> No doubt.
>
> Double-A

The interstellar ramjet notion which needs 99.9%c just to get started,
sounds about right, like a big horn or funnel facing into the cosmic
wind of mostly hydrogen could bring all of that highly charged
hydrogen and whatever 3He plus a few other assorted elements into a
fusion reactor where it first gets further magnetic compacted by
1e6:1, and subsequently ignites like a controlled nova or black hole
that offers a kind of polar exhaust jet that’s superluminal. This
should work even if there’s only 1 atom of hydrogen/m3, such as a km2
horn/funnel should encounter 1e6 atoms * 3e8 = 3e14 atoms/sec, plus
<1e14 of assorted other elements gives us 4e14 atoms/sec, vectored
down to a cm3 = 1e6:1 compression to start off with, at say the
average worth of 2.25e-24 gram each = 1e-9 gram per second that’s
further magnetic focused and/or compressed by yet another 1e6:1 into a
nm3 of a fusion worthy kind of micro black hole that by rights should
ignite and exit at 2c.

Btw; our STS-75 tether incident has some of them ET/UFO suckers on
video. Didn't you ever bother to read or look at anything by David
Sereda?

You do realize there are other NASA official though nondisclosure
classified as need-to-know videos of similar UFOs and out-of-this-
world weird stuff.

If you were an ET, how would you get yourself to/from Venus without
ever being detected by us?

On the other hand, why would any ET in their right mind care if they
were seen passing by? (isn't Earth a rather pathetic dysfunctional
joke of a planet to ETs, as well as it is to seans?)

~ BG

John Ayres
2010-02-18 19:43:53 EST
On Thu, 18 Feb 2010 06:47:51 -0800 (PST), Brad Guth
<*h@gmail.com> wrote:

>On Feb 18, 2:40 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> A US boffin has effectively put the mockers on Star Trek-style warp
>> speed travel to the stars by warning that interstellar hydrogen gas
>> would become deadly to humans as they approached the speed of light.
>>
>> Professor William Edelstein of the Johns Hopkins University School of
>> Medicine explained to New Scientist that while interstellar space has
>> just a couple of hydrogen atoms per cubic centimetre, as the crew of
>> the Enterprise hit the gas pedal, a compression effect would greatly
>> increase the number of atoms hitting the spacecraft.
>>
>> As the spaceship reached 99.999998 per cent of the speed of light,
>> "hydrogen atoms would seem to reach a staggering 7 teraelectron
>> volts", which for the crew "would be like standing in front of the
>> Large Hadron Collider beam".
>>
>> This is a very bad thing, because humans in the path of this ray would
>> receive a dose of ionising radiation of 10,000 sieverts, and as Bones
>> McCoy would doubtless confirm, the lethal dose is 6 sieverts.
>>
>> The result? Death in one second.
>>
>> The spacecraft's structure would do little to mitigate the effects of
>> the killer hydrogen. Edelstein "calculates that a 10-centimetre-thick
>> layer of aluminium would absorb less than 1 per cent of the energy",
>> and the intense doses of radiation would damage the ship's structure
>> and fry its electronics.
>>
>> Edelstein grimly concluded: "Hydrogen atoms are unavoidable space
>> mines."
>>
>> The professor presented his killer calculations to an American
>> Physical Society meeting in Washington DC on Saturday.
>> Bootnote
>>
>> Of course, Edelstein's conclusions are based on current scientific
>> knowledge. No doubt future spacecraft designers will deploy advanced
>> radiation-resistant alloys and magnetic shielding to protect
>> Federation staff from instant death.
>
>So what? Use 10+ meters of aluminum or also incorporate another thick
>layer of water as the shield against those nasty hydrogen and a few
>other particles that pile up against the bow of your spacecraft.
>
>Perhaps using an extended kind of leading nose or battering ram that
>emitted trillions upon trillions of ions or positrons/s/cm2 would take
>up most of the nasty hydrogen radiation, with the main ship following
>a few km behind. That way you could easily go FTL. (those positrons
>of antimatter pulling instead of pushing)
>
>There now, I fixed everything.
>
>As a whole we're already going .0025c towards The Great Attractor, and
>lord only knows how fast the GA is going. According to some
>(including that other crazy Guth guy), our universe has been expanding
>itself in all directions at c.
>
> ~ BG

Won't building up your own indestructible gravitational field mitigate
any such minor problems? Now all we need is the technology to build a
gravitational field and keep it intact as we travel several million or
possibly several billion times faster than the speed of light. The
gravitational field will probably produce a countering force. Anyway,
that's one huge powertrain running down the lines. Of course, how to
get the craft up and running at that speed is just another minor
matter of study on our part. Too bad we don't have any alien friends
willing to share their technologies with us, as yet. I say we give a
"yo heave ho", to the men in black, and throw them overboard.

John Ayres

Brad Guth
2010-02-18 19:59:33 EST
On Feb 18, 4:43 pm, John Ayres <jon.john@aol_dot_com.au> wrote:
> On Thu, 18 Feb 2010 06:47:51 -0800 (PST), Brad Guth
>
>
>
> <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >On Feb 18, 2:40 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >> A US boffin has effectively put the mockers on Star Trek-style warp
> >> speed travel to the stars by warning that interstellar hydrogen gas
> >> would become deadly to humans as they approached the speed of light.
>
> >> Professor William Edelstein of the Johns Hopkins University School of
> >> Medicine explained to New Scientist that while interstellar space has
> >> just a couple of hydrogen atoms per cubic centimetre, as the crew of
> >> the Enterprise hit the gas pedal, a compression effect would greatly
> >> increase the number of atoms hitting the spacecraft.
>
> >> As the spaceship reached 99.999998 per cent of the speed of light,
> >> "hydrogen atoms would seem to reach a staggering 7 teraelectron
> >> volts", which for the crew "would be like standing in front of the
> >> Large Hadron Collider beam".
>
> >> This is a very bad thing, because humans in the path of this ray would
> >> receive a dose of ionising radiation of 10,000 sieverts, and as Bones
> >> McCoy would doubtless confirm, the lethal dose is 6 sieverts.
>
> >> The result? Death in one second.
>
> >> The spacecraft's structure would do little to mitigate the effects of
> >> the killer hydrogen. Edelstein "calculates that a 10-centimetre-thick
> >> layer of aluminium would absorb less than 1 per cent of the energy",
> >> and the intense doses of radiation would damage the ship's structure
> >> and fry its electronics.
>
> >> Edelstein grimly concluded: "Hydrogen atoms are unavoidable space
> >> mines."
>
> >> The professor presented his killer calculations to an American
> >> Physical Society meeting in Washington DC on Saturday.
> >> Bootnote
>
> >> Of course, Edelstein's conclusions are based on current scientific
> >> knowledge. No doubt future spacecraft designers will deploy advanced
> >> radiation-resistant alloys and magnetic shielding to protect
> >> Federation staff from instant death.
>
> >So what?  Use 10+ meters of aluminum or also incorporate another thick
> >layer of water as the shield against those nasty hydrogen and a few
> >other particles that pile up against the bow of your spacecraft.
>
> >Perhaps using an extended kind of leading nose or battering ram that
> >emitted trillions upon trillions of ions or positrons/s/cm2 would take
> >up most of the nasty hydrogen radiation, with the main ship following
> >a few km behind.  That way you could easily go FTL. (those positrons
> >of antimatter pulling instead of pushing)
>
> >There now, I fixed everything.
>
> >As a whole we're already going .0025c towards The Great Attractor, and
> >lord only knows how fast the GA is going.  According to some
> >(including that other crazy Guth guy), our universe has been expanding
> >itself in all directions at c.
>
> > ~ BG
>
> Won't building up your own indestructible gravitational field mitigate
> any such minor problems? Now all we need is the technology to build a
> gravitational field and keep it intact as we travel several million or
> possibly several billion times faster than the speed of light. The
> gravitational field will probably produce a countering force. Anyway,
> that's one huge powertrain running down the lines. Of course, how to
> get the craft up and running at that speed is just another minor
> matter of study on our part. Too bad we don't have any alien friends
> willing to share their technologies with us, as yet. I say we give a
> "yo heave ho", to the men in black, and throw them overboard.
>
> John Ayres

Our local cosmic gravity is currently moving along with us at <750 km/
s, while taking us into the Great Attractor is why we feel nothing
unusual.

There are a few stars moving at <.5c.

It seems our Sean Rothschilds are about as worthless as those MIB.

~ BG

John Ayres
2010-02-18 20:13:54 EST
On Thu, 18 Feb 2010 16:59:33 -0800 (PST), Brad Guth
<*h@gmail.com> wrote:

>On Feb 18, 4:43 pm, John Ayres <jon.john@aol_dot_com.au> wrote:
>> On Thu, 18 Feb 2010 06:47:51 -0800 (PST), Brad Guth
>>
>>
>>
>> <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> >On Feb 18, 2:40 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> >> A US boffin has effectively put the mockers on Star Trek-style warp
>> >> speed travel to the stars by warning that interstellar hydrogen gas
>> >> would become deadly to humans as they approached the speed of light.
>>
>> >> Professor William Edelstein of the Johns Hopkins University School of
>> >> Medicine explained to New Scientist that while interstellar space has
>> >> just a couple of hydrogen atoms per cubic centimetre, as the crew of
>> >> the Enterprise hit the gas pedal, a compression effect would greatly
>> >> increase the number of atoms hitting the spacecraft.
>>
>> >> As the spaceship reached 99.999998 per cent of the speed of light,
>> >> "hydrogen atoms would seem to reach a staggering 7 teraelectron
>> >> volts", which for the crew "would be like standing in front of the
>> >> Large Hadron Collider beam".
>>
>> >> This is a very bad thing, because humans in the path of this ray would
>> >> receive a dose of ionising radiation of 10,000 sieverts, and as Bones
>> >> McCoy would doubtless confirm, the lethal dose is 6 sieverts.
>>
>> >> The result? Death in one second.
>>
>> >> The spacecraft's structure would do little to mitigate the effects of
>> >> the killer hydrogen. Edelstein "calculates that a 10-centimetre-thick
>> >> layer of aluminium would absorb less than 1 per cent of the energy",
>> >> and the intense doses of radiation would damage the ship's structure
>> >> and fry its electronics.
>>
>> >> Edelstein grimly concluded: "Hydrogen atoms are unavoidable space
>> >> mines."
>>
>> >> The professor presented his killer calculations to an American
>> >> Physical Society meeting in Washington DC on Saturday.
>> >> Bootnote
>>
>> >> Of course, Edelstein's conclusions are based on current scientific
>> >> knowledge. No doubt future spacecraft designers will deploy advanced
>> >> radiation-resistant alloys and magnetic shielding to protect
>> >> Federation staff from instant death.
>>
>> >So what?  Use 10+ meters of aluminum or also incorporate another thick
>> >layer of water as the shield against those nasty hydrogen and a few
>> >other particles that pile up against the bow of your spacecraft.
>>
>> >Perhaps using an extended kind of leading nose or battering ram that
>> >emitted trillions upon trillions of ions or positrons/s/cm2 would take
>> >up most of the nasty hydrogen radiation, with the main ship following
>> >a few km behind.  That way you could easily go FTL. (those positrons
>> >of antimatter pulling instead of pushing)
>>
>> >There now, I fixed everything.
>>
>> >As a whole we're already going .0025c towards The Great Attractor, and
>> >lord only knows how fast the GA is going.  According to some
>> >(including that other crazy Guth guy), our universe has been expanding
>> >itself in all directions at c.
>>
>> > ~ BG
>>
>> Won't building up your own indestructible gravitational field mitigate
>> any such minor problems? Now all we need is the technology to build a
>> gravitational field and keep it intact as we travel several million or
>> possibly several billion times faster than the speed of light. The
>> gravitational field will probably produce a countering force. Anyway,
>> that's one huge powertrain running down the lines. Of course, how to
>> get the craft up and running at that speed is just another minor
>> matter of study on our part. Too bad we don't have any alien friends
>> willing to share their technologies with us, as yet. I say we give a
>> "yo heave ho", to the men in black, and throw them overboard.
>>
>> John Ayres
>
>Our local cosmic gravity is currently moving along with us at <750 km/
>s, while taking us into the Great Attractor is why we feel nothing
>unusual.
<...>

I would say that because we are firmly clamped down in this
gravitational fields is why we feel nothing unusual and why we are not
puking our guts out.

John Ayres


Brad Guth
2010-02-18 20:59:07 EST
On Feb 18, 5:13 pm, John Ayres <jon.john@aol_dot_com.au> wrote:
> On Thu, 18 Feb 2010 16:59:33 -0800 (PST), Brad Guth
>
>
>
> <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >On Feb 18, 4:43 pm, John Ayres <jon.john@aol_dot_com.au> wrote:
> >> On Thu, 18 Feb 2010 06:47:51 -0800 (PST), Brad Guth
>
> >> <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >> >On Feb 18, 2:40 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >> >> A US boffin has effectively put the mockers on Star Trek-style warp
> >> >> speed travel to the stars by warning that interstellar hydrogen gas
> >> >> would become deadly to humans as they approached the speed of light.
>
> >> >> Professor William Edelstein of the Johns Hopkins University School of
> >> >> Medicine explained to New Scientist that while interstellar space has
> >> >> just a couple of hydrogen atoms per cubic centimetre, as the crew of
> >> >> the Enterprise hit the gas pedal, a compression effect would greatly
> >> >> increase the number of atoms hitting the spacecraft.
>
> >> >> As the spaceship reached 99.999998 per cent of the speed of light,
> >> >> "hydrogen atoms would seem to reach a staggering 7 teraelectron
> >> >> volts", which for the crew "would be like standing in front of the
> >> >> Large Hadron Collider beam".
>
> >> >> This is a very bad thing, because humans in the path of this ray would
> >> >> receive a dose of ionising radiation of 10,000 sieverts, and as Bones
> >> >> McCoy would doubtless confirm, the lethal dose is 6 sieverts.
>
> >> >> The result? Death in one second.
>
> >> >> The spacecraft's structure would do little to mitigate the effects of
> >> >> the killer hydrogen. Edelstein "calculates that a 10-centimetre-thick
> >> >> layer of aluminium would absorb less than 1 per cent of the energy",
> >> >> and the intense doses of radiation would damage the ship's structure
> >> >> and fry its electronics.
>
> >> >> Edelstein grimly concluded: "Hydrogen atoms are unavoidable space
> >> >> mines."
>
> >> >> The professor presented his killer calculations to an American
> >> >> Physical Society meeting in Washington DC on Saturday.
> >> >> Bootnote
>
> >> >> Of course, Edelstein's conclusions are based on current scientific
> >> >> knowledge. No doubt future spacecraft designers will deploy advanced
> >> >> radiation-resistant alloys and magnetic shielding to protect
> >> >> Federation staff from instant death.
>
> >> >So what?  Use 10+ meters of aluminum or also incorporate another thick
> >> >layer of water as the shield against those nasty hydrogen and a few
> >> >other particles that pile up against the bow of your spacecraft.
>
> >> >Perhaps using an extended kind of leading nose or battering ram that
> >> >emitted trillions upon trillions of ions or positrons/s/cm2 would take
> >> >up most of the nasty hydrogen radiation, with the main ship following
> >> >a few km behind.  That way you could easily go FTL. (those positrons
> >> >of antimatter pulling instead of pushing)
>
> >> >There now, I fixed everything.
>
> >> >As a whole we're already going .0025c towards The Great Attractor, and
> >> >lord only knows how fast the GA is going.  According to some
> >> >(including that other crazy Guth guy), our universe has been expanding
> >> >itself in all directions at c.
>
> >> > ~ BG
>
> >> Won't building up your own indestructible gravitational field mitigate
> >> any such minor problems? Now all we need is the technology to build a
> >> gravitational field and keep it intact as we travel several million or
> >> possibly several billion times faster than the speed of light. The
> >> gravitational field will probably produce a countering force. Anyway,
> >> that's one huge powertrain running down the lines. Of course, how to
> >> get the craft up and running at that speed is just another minor
> >> matter of study on our part. Too bad we don't have any alien friends
> >> willing to share their technologies with us, as yet. I say we give a
> >> "yo heave ho", to the men in black, and throw them overboard.
>
> >> John Ayres
>
> >Our local cosmic gravity is currently moving along with us at <750 km/
> >s, while taking us into the Great Attractor is why we feel nothing
> >unusual.
>
> <...>
>
> I would say that because we are firmly clamped down in this
> gravitational fields is why we feel nothing unusual and why we are not
> puking our guts out.
>
> John Ayres

If our galaxy were sped up to c, we wouldn't feel a thing.

~ BG
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