Research Discussion: Cosmic Roadblock

Cosmic Roadblock
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HVAC
2009-12-15 09:40:48 EST
Are we the lone sentient life in the universe? So far, we have no
evidence to the contrary, and yet the odds that not one single other
planet has evolved intelligent life would appear, from a statistical
standpoint, to be quite small. There are an estimated 250 billion (2.5
x 10¹¹ ) stars in the Milky Way alone, and over 70 sextillion (7 x
10²² ) in the visible universe, and many of them are surrounded by
multiple planets.

Meanwhile, our 4.5 billion-year old Solar System exits in a universe
that is estimated to be between 13.5 and 14 billion years old. Experts
believe that there could be advanced civilizations out there that have
existed for 1.8 gigayears (one gigayear = one billion years).

The odds of there being only one single planet that evolved life among
all that unfathomable vastness seems so incredible that it is all but
completely irrational to believe. But then "where are they?" asked
physicist Enrico Fermi while having lunch with his colleagues in 1950.

Fermi reasoned, if there are other advanced extraterrestrial
civilizations, then why is there no evidence of such, like spacecraft
or probes floating around the Milky Way. His question became famously
known as the Fermi Paradox. The paradox is the contradiction between
the high estimates of the probability of the existence of
extraterrestrial civilizations and yet the lack of evidence for, or
contact with, any such civilizations.

Given the extreme age of the universe, and its vast number of stars,
if planets like Earth are at all typical, then there should be many
advanced extraterrestrial civilizations out there, and at least a few
in our own Milky Way. Another closely related question is the Great
Silence, which poses the question: Even if space travel is too
difficult, if life is out there, why don't we at least detect some
sign of civilization like radio transmissions?

Milan Cirkovic of the Astronomical Observatory in Belgrade, points out
that the median age of terrestrial planets in the Milky Way is about
1.8 gigayears greater than the age of the Earth and the Solar System,
which means that the median age of technological civilizations should
be greater than the age of human civilization by the same amount. The
vastness of this interval indicates that one or more processes must
suppress observability of extraterrestrial communities.

Since at this point, there is no direct and/or widely apparent
evidence that extraterrestrial life exists, it likely means one of the
following:

We are (A) the first intelligent beings ever to become capable of
making our presence known, and leaving our planet. At this point,
there are no other life forms out there as advanced as us. Or perhaps
extraterrestrial life does exists, but for some reason
extraterrestrial life is so very rare and so very far away we’ll never
make contact anyway—making extraterrestrial life nonexistent in a
practical sense at least.

Or is it (B) that many advanced civilizations have existed before us,
but without exception, they have for some unknown reason, existed and/
or expanded in such a way that they are completely undetectable by our
instruments.

Or is it (C) There have been others, but they have all run into some
sort of “cosmic roadblock” that eventually destroys them, or at least
prevents their expansion beyond a small area.

Then ancients once believed that Earth was the center of the universe.
We now know that Earth isn’t even at the center of the Solar System.
The Solar System is not at the center of our galaxy, and our galaxy is
not in any special position in contrast to the rest of the known
universe. From a scientific viewpoint, there is no apparent reason to
believe that Earth enjoys some privileged status.

Since Earth’s placement in space and time appears to be unremarkably
random, proposition “A” seems fairly unlikely. Assuming humans evolved
like other forms of life into our present state due to natural
selection, then there's really nothing all that mystical, special or
remarkable about our development as a species either. Due to the shear
numbers, there are almost certainly other planets capable of
supporting at least some form of life. If that is so, then for
Earthlings to be the very first species ever to make a noticeable mark
on the universe, from a statistical perspective, is incredibly
unlikely.

For proposition “B” to be correct would defy all logic. If potentially
thousands, or even millions of advanced extraterrestrial civilizations
exist in the known universe, then why would all of them, without
exception, choose to expand or exist in such a way that they are
completely undetectable? It’s conceivable that some might, or perhaps
even the majority, but for all of them to be completely undetectable
civilizations does not seem likely either.

Proposition C in some ways, appears to be more likely than A or B. If
“survival of the fittest” follows similar pathways on other worlds,
then our own “civilized” nature could be somewhat typical of
extraterrestrial civilizations that have, or do, exist. Somehow, we
all get to the point where we end up killing ourselves in a natural
course of technological development and thereby self-inflict our own
“cosmic roadblock”.

“Perhaps the most disturbing aspect of the Fermi Paradox is what
it suggests for the future of our human civilization. Namely, that we
have no future beyond earthly confinement and, quite possibly,
extinction. Could advanced nanotechnology play a role in preventing
that extinction? Or, more darkly, is it destined to be instrumental in
carrying out humanity's unavoidable death sentence?” wonders Mike
Treder, executive director of the Center for Responsible
Nanotechnology (CRN).

Treder believes that some of the little understood new technologies
now being developed such as nanotech, and others, could well be either
our salvation or just as likely end up causing our ultimate
destruction.

“Whatever civilizations have come before us have been unable to
surpass the cosmic roadblock. They are either destroyed or limited in
such a way that absolutely precludes their expansion into the visible
universe. If that is indeed the case—and it would seem to be the most
logical explanation for Fermi's Paradox—then there is some immutable
law that we too must expect to encounter at some point. We are,
effectively, sentenced to death or, at best, life in the prison of a
near-space bubble,” suggests Treder. “Atomically-precise exponential
manufacturing could enable such concentrations of unprecedented power
as to result in either terminal warfare or permanent enslavement of
the human race. Of course, that sounds terribly apocalyptic, but it is
worth considering that the warnings we heard at the start of the
nuclear arms race, and the very real risks we faced in the height of
the Cold War, were but precursors to a much greater threat posed by an
arms race involving nano-built weaponry and its accompanying tools of
surveillance and control.”

When we consider the chronological history of life on Earth, humans
have only existed for a small fragment of time and our existence has
always been precarious. The entire time we’ve existed, we been banding
into various groups and attempting to kill each other—or at least are
constantly in the process of developing more effective ways of killing
each other—just in case. The US government, for example, spends on
“Defense” (including “preemptive” warfare) and Homeland Security, 8
times what it spends on educating the next generation. There is enough
nuclear weaponry in storage around the world to kill every living
creature on the planet several times over. Clearly, we’re a species
with poor odds of surviving indefinitely.

Our self-destructive natures aside, curiosity may end up killing more
than the cats. The faster technology is advancing, the more our “leap
now, look later” nature appears to grow as well. If evolution on Earth
serves as a somewhat typical template for evolution of other life
forms, then becoming a truly advanced civilization must be a very
daunting task indeed and a very rare, if not impossible, achievement.

In fact, Sir Martin Rees, Great Britain's Astronomer Royal and
respected professor of astrophysics at Cambridge University has
estimated that humans have only a 50-50 shot of making it through the
21st century. If Rees is right, and our standing on the planet is as
precarious as he and others believe it is, then we may be alone due to
a built-in evolutionary self-destruct button. Others have come before
and others will exist after, but the cosmic roadblock may be an
innate, finite nature, which only allows sentient life forms to exist
for a very small window of time—windows of life which may be too small
for our civilization to match up with the small windows of other
civilizations that have been before or will come after.

In a contrary point of view, Milan Cirkovic believes that highly
efficient city-state type of advanced technological civilizations
could easily pass unnoticed even by much more advanced SETI equipment,
especially if located near the Milky Way rim or other remote
locations.

Posted by Rebecca Sato with Casey Kazan.




Editor's Note: Once a species learns to manipulate it's environment
in a manner
that allows it to dominate it's planet, it's population soon becomes
unsustainable.


_//!! _//!!
2009-12-15 13:20:40 EST
On 20 July 2009

"*_//!!_//!!*" <*TheInvisibleAngel*@tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
news:4a6d8B65$1_1@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...

Your solar system lies on the outer edge of your galaxy, The Milky Way,
as opposed to the inner centre of The Milky Way, which also makes it
more congenial for life to exist & flourish.

Activity towards the Centre is *Greater* than that towards the outer edges.
Clue as to where to look for other life and alternative possibilities.

GALAXY:

(* ( ( ( ( X ) ) ) ) *) = Cooler/Less Active Region of a Galaxy.

You're *Brilliant*, Angel, even under Very difficult circumstances.

*Hallelujah*

*Amen*



HVAC
2009-12-15 15:52:11 EST

"_//!! _//!!" <TheInvisibleAngel@freenews.netfront.net> wrote in message
news:hg8kuo$1ejs$1@adenine.netfront.net...
>
> Your solar system lies on the outer edge of your galaxy, The Milky Way,
> as opposed to the inner centre of The Milky Way, which also makes it
> more congenial for life to exist & flourish.
>
> Activity towards the Centre is *Greater* than that towards the outer
> edges.
> Clue as to where to look for other life and alternative possibilities.
>
> GALAXY:
>
> (* ( ( ( ( X ) ) ) ) *) = Cooler/Less Active Region of a Galaxy.
>
> You're *Brilliant*, Angel, even under Very difficult circumstances.


Hold the phone there retard.

Before you break your arm patting yourself on the
back, wrap your puny mind around THIS....

The central region of the galaxy is FILLED with
energy in the form of high energy gamma rays.

These are harmful to life and if the Earth was
located there it would soon be rendered sterile.



You're welcome.




Jimbo
2009-12-15 16:00:20 EST
On Dec 15, 3:52 pm, "HVAC" <harlowcampb...@gmail.com> wrote:
> "_//!! _//!!" <TheInvisibleAn...@freenews.netfront.net> wrote in message
>
> news:hg8kuo$1ejs$1@adenine.netfront.net...
>
>
>
> > Your solar system lies on the outer edge of your galaxy, The Milky Way,
> > as opposed to the inner centre of The Milky Way, which also makes it
> > more congenial for life to exist & flourish.
>
> > Activity towards the Centre is *Greater* than that towards the outer
> > edges.
> > Clue as to where to look for other life and alternative possibilities.
>
> >         GALAXY:
>
> > (*  (  ( ( ( X ) ) )  )  *) = Cooler/Less Active Region of  a Galaxy.
>
> > You're *Brilliant*, Angel, even under Very difficult circumstances.
>
> Hold the phone there retard.
>
> Before you break your arm patting yourself on the
> back, wrap your puny mind around THIS....
>
> The central region of the galaxy is FILLED with
> energy in the form of high energy gamma rays.
>
> These are harmful to life and if the Earth was
> located there it would soon be rendered sterile.
>
> You're welcome.

Or at least harmful to life as we know life.

Jimbo
2009-12-15 16:00:23 EST
On Dec 15, 9:40 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Are we the lone sentient life in the universe? So far, we have no
> evidence to the contrary, and yet the odds that not one single other
> planet has evolved intelligent life would appear, from a statistical
> standpoint, to be quite small. There are an estimated 250 billion (2.5
> x 10¹¹ ) stars in the Milky Way alone, and over 70 sextillion (7 x
> 10²² ) in the visible universe, and many of them are surrounded by
> multiple planets.

Well, let's look at the odds further though. True, the odds that not
one single other planet has evolved "intelligent" life (The jury is
still out on us, btw) is rather small, but the odds that not one
single other planet has evolved "intelligent" life, that did not
manage to destroy themselves before, or suffer an extinction level
catastrophe prior to developing interstellar space travel is probably
much larger.

Those that did make it that far may have come to Earth, and did not
discover "intelligent" life.

_//!! _//!!
2009-12-15 18:02:19 EST
> "_//!! _//!!" <TheInvisibleAngel@freenews.netfront.net> wrote in message
> news:hg8kuo$1ejs$1@adenine.netfront.net...
>>
>> Your solar system lies on the outer edge of your galaxy, The Milky Way,
>> as opposed to the inner centre of The Milky Way, which also makes it
>> more congenial for life to exist & flourish.
>>
>> Activity towards the Centre is *Greater* than that towards the outer
>> edges.
>> Clue as to where to look for other life and alternative possibilities.
>>
>> GALAXY:
>>
>> (* ( ( ( ( X ) ) ) ) *) = Cooler/Less Active Region of a Galaxy.
>>
>> You're *Brilliant*, Angel, even under Very difficult circumstances.

*Hallelujah*

*Amen*



_//!! _//!!
2009-12-15 18:04:51 EST
"_//!! _//!!" <TheInvisibleAn...@freenews.netfront.net> wrote in message
> news:hg8kuo$1ejs$1@adenine.netfront.net...
>>
>> Your solar system lies on the outer edge of your galaxy, The Milky Way,
>> as opposed to the inner centre of The Milky Way, which also makes it
>> more congenial for life to exist & flourish.
>
>> Activity towards the Centre is *Greater* than that towards the outer
>> edges.
>> Clue as to where to look for other life and alternative possibilities.
>
>> GALAXY:
>
>> (* ( ( ( ( X ) ) ) ) *) = Cooler/Less Active Region of a Galaxy.
>
>> You're *Brilliant*, Angel, even under Very difficult circumstances.
>
>>*Hallelujah*
>
>>*Amen*



*_//!!_//!!*
2009-12-15 19:59:52 EST
On 15 Dec, 23:04, "_//!! _//!!"
<*.@freenews.netfront.net> wrote:
>  "_//!! _//!!" <TheInvisibleAn...@freenews.netfront.net> wrote in message
>
> Your solar system lies on the outer edge of your galaxy, The Milky Way,
> as opposed to the inner centre of The Milky Way, which also makes it
> more congenial for life to exist & flourish.
>
> Activity towards the Centre is *Greater* than that towards the outer edges.
>
> The Clue as to where to look for other life and alternative possibilities.
>
> GALAXY:
>
> (* ( ( ( ( X ) ) ) ) *) = Cooler/Less Active Region of a Galaxy.
>
> You are *Brilliant*, *Angel*,.....even under 'Very Difficult' JEALOUS,
> Extremely, Egotistical, Envious, Evil Male Chauvinistic ~Catholic~
> Circumstances.
>
> *Hallelujah*
>
> *Amen*

~They~ have tried everything to DESTROY *you*, but have ~FAILED~

_//!! _//!!
2009-12-15 20:08:40 EST

"*_//!!_//!!*" <harpie1@googlemail.com> wrote in message
news:0f0ff130-5b90-4c41-95bf-8072c091ff02@33g2000vbe.googlegroups.com...
On 15 Dec, 23:04, "_//!! _//!!"
<*.@freenews.netfront.net> wrote:
> "_//!! _//!!" <TheInvisibleAn...@freenews.netfront.net> wrote in message
>
> Your solar system lies on the outer edge of your galaxy, The Milky Way,
> as opposed to the inner centre of The Milky Way, which also makes it
> more congenial for life to exist & flourish.
>
> Activity towards the Centre is *Greater* than that towards the outer
> edges.
>
> The Clue as to where to look for other life and alternative possibilities.
>
> GALAXY:
>
> (* ( ( ( ( X ) ) ) ) *) = Cooler/Less Active Region of a Galaxy.
>
> You are *Brilliant*, *Angel*,.....even under 'Very Difficult' JEALOUS,
> Extremely, Egotistical, Envious, Evil Male Chauvinistic ~Catholic~
> Circumstances.
>
> *Hallelujah*
>
> *Amen*

~They~ have tried everything to DESTROY *you*, but have ~FAILED~.

*Hallelujah*

*Amen*



The Gospel Truth
2009-12-15 20:43:39 EST
On Dec 15, 9:40 am, HVAC <mr.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Are we the lone sentient life in the universe? So far, we have no
> evidence to the contrary, and yet the odds that not one single other
> planet has evolved intelligent life would appear, from a statistical
> standpoint, to be quite small. There are an estimated 250 billion (2.5
> x 10¹¹ ) stars in the Milky Way alone, and over 70 sextillion (7 x
> 10²² ) in the visible universe, and many of them are surrounded by
> multiple planets.
>
> Meanwhile, our 4.5 billion-year old Solar System exits in a universe
> that is estimated to be between 13.5 and 14 billion years old. Experts
> believe that there could be advanced civilizations out there that have
> existed for 1.8 gigayears (one gigayear = one billion years).
>
> The odds of there being only one single planet that evolved life among
> all that unfathomable vastness seems so incredible that it is all but
> completely irrational to believe. But then "where are they?" asked
> physicist Enrico Fermi while having lunch with his colleagues in 1950.
>
> Fermi reasoned, if there are other advanced extraterrestrial
> civilizations, then why is there no evidence of such, like spacecraft
> or probes floating around the Milky Way. His question became famously
> known as the Fermi Paradox. The paradox is the contradiction between
> the high estimates of the probability of the existence of
> extraterrestrial civilizations and yet the lack of evidence for, or
> contact with, any such civilizations.
>
> Given the extreme age of the universe, and its vast number of stars,
> if planets like Earth are at all typical, then there should be many
> advanced extraterrestrial civilizations out there, and at least a few
> in our own Milky Way. Another closely related question is the Great
> Silence, which poses the question: Even if space travel is too
> difficult, if life is out there, why don't we at least detect some
> sign of civilization like radio transmissions?
>
> Milan Cirkovic of the Astronomical Observatory in Belgrade, points out
> that the median age of terrestrial planets in the Milky Way is about
> 1.8 gigayears greater than the age of the Earth and the Solar System,
> which means that the median age of technological civilizations should
> be greater than the age of human civilization by the same amount. The
> vastness of this interval indicates that one or more processes must
> suppress observability of extraterrestrial communities.
>
> Since at this point, there is no direct and/or widely apparent
> evidence that extraterrestrial life exists, it likely means one of the
> following:
>
> We are (A) the first intelligent beings ever to become capable of
> making our presence known, and leaving our planet. At this point,
> there are no other life forms out there as advanced as us. Or perhaps
> extraterrestrial life does exists, but for some reason
> extraterrestrial life is so very rare and so very far away we’ll never
> make contact anyway—making extraterrestrial life nonexistent in a
> practical sense at least.
>
> Or is it (B) that many advanced civilizations have existed before us,
> but without exception, they have for some unknown reason, existed and/
> or expanded in such a way that they are completely undetectable by our
> instruments.
>
> Or is it (C) There have been others, but they have all run into some
> sort of “cosmic roadblock” that eventually destroys them, or at least
> prevents their expansion beyond a small area.
>
> Then ancients once believed that Earth was the center of the universe.
> We now know that Earth isn’t even at the center of the Solar System.
> The Solar System is not at the center of our galaxy, and our galaxy is
> not in any special position in contrast to the rest of the known
> universe. From a scientific viewpoint, there is no apparent reason to
> believe that Earth enjoys some privileged status.
>
> Since Earth’s placement in space and time appears to be unremarkably
> random, proposition “A” seems fairly unlikely. Assuming humans evolved
> like other forms of life into our present state due to natural
> selection, then there's really nothing all that mystical, special or
> remarkable about our development as a species either. Due to the shear
> numbers, there are almost certainly other planets capable of
> supporting at least some form of life. If that is so, then for
> Earthlings to be the very first species ever to make a noticeable mark
> on the universe, from a statistical perspective, is incredibly
> unlikely.
>
> For proposition “B” to be correct would defy all logic. If potentially
> thousands, or even millions of advanced extraterrestrial civilizations
> exist in the known universe, then why would all of them, without
> exception, choose to expand or exist in such a way that they are
> completely undetectable? It’s conceivable that some might, or perhaps
> even the majority, but for all of them to be completely undetectable
> civilizations does not seem likely either.
>
> Proposition C in some ways, appears to be more likely than A or B. If
> “survival of the fittest” follows similar pathways on other worlds,
> then our own “civilized” nature could be somewhat typical of
> extraterrestrial civilizations that have, or do, exist. Somehow, we
> all get to the point where we end up killing ourselves in a natural
> course of technological development and thereby self-inflict our own
> “cosmic roadblock”.
>
>     “Perhaps the most disturbing aspect of the Fermi Paradox is what
> it suggests for the future of our human civilization. Namely, that we
> have no future beyond earthly confinement and, quite possibly,
> extinction. Could advanced nanotechnology play a role in preventing
> that extinction? Or, more darkly, is it destined to be instrumental in
> carrying out humanity's unavoidable death sentence?” wonders Mike
> Treder, executive director of the Center for Responsible
> Nanotechnology (CRN).
>
> Treder believes that some of the little understood new technologies
> now being developed such as nanotech, and others, could well be either
> our salvation or just as likely end up causing our ultimate
> destruction.
>
>     “Whatever civilizations have come before us have been unable to
> surpass the cosmic roadblock. They are either destroyed or limited in
> such a way that absolutely precludes their expansion into the visible
> universe. If that is indeed the case—and it would seem to be the most
> logical explanation for Fermi's Paradox—then there is some immutable
> law that we too must expect to encounter at some point. We are,
> effectively, sentenced to death or, at best, life in the prison of a
> near-space bubble,” suggests Treder. “Atomically-precise exponential
> manufacturing could enable such concentrations of unprecedented power
> as to result in either terminal warfare or permanent enslavement of
> the human race. Of course, that sounds terribly apocalyptic, but it is
> worth considering that the warnings we heard at the start of the
> nuclear arms race, and the very real risks we faced in the height of
> the Cold War, were but precursors to a much greater threat posed by an
> arms race involving nano-built weaponry and its accompanying tools of
> surveillance and control.”
>
> When we consider the chronological history of life on Earth, humans
> have only existed for a small fragment of time and our existence has
> always been precarious. The entire time we’ve existed, we been banding
> into various groups and attempting to kill each other—or at least are
> constantly in the process of developing more effective ways of killing
> each other—just in case. The US government, for example, spends on
> “Defense” (including “preemptive” warfare) and Homeland Security, 8
> times what it spends on educating the next generation. There is enough
> nuclear weaponry in storage around the world to kill every living
> creature on the planet several times over. Clearly, we’re a species
> with poor odds of surviving indefinitely.
>
> Our self-destructive natures aside, curiosity may end up killing more
> than the cats. The faster technology is advancing, the more our “leap
> now, look later” nature appears to grow as well. If evolution on Earth
> serves as a somewhat typical template for evolution of other life
> forms, then becoming a truly advanced civilization must be a very
> daunting task indeed and a very rare, if not impossible, achievement.
>
> In fact, Sir Martin Rees, Great Britain's Astronomer Royal and
> respected professor of astrophysics at Cambridge University has
> estimated that humans have only a 50-50 shot of making it through the
> 21st century. If Rees is right, and our standing on the planet is as
> precarious as he and others believe it is, then we may be alone due to
> a built-in evolutionary self-destruct button. Others have come before
> and others will exist after, but the cosmic roadblock may be an
> innate, finite nature, which only allows sentient life forms to exist
> for a very small window of time—windows of life which may be too small
> for our civilization to match up with the small windows of other
> civilizations that have been before or will come after.
>
> In a contrary point of view, Milan Cirkovic believes that highly
> efficient city-state type of advanced technological civilizations
> could easily pass unnoticed even by much more advanced SETI equipment,
> especially if located near the Milky Way rim or other remote
> locations.
>
> Posted by Rebecca Sato with Casey Kazan.
>
> Editor's Note:  Once a species learns to manipulate it's environment
> in a manner
> that allows it to dominate it's planet, it's population soon becomes
> unsustainable.

Obviously of the green people race Is Al gory Gore their hero.....?

Democrats are a non human race. It's all in the genes.....

Hey Earth Species....deny this


Islam and Israel exist, and are "in our face". That cannot be denied.

Both have a 'seed' of origin. The only two on the planet who do....

Genesis 16 Islam
Genesis 17 Israel

That means the Torah is the Almighty God HaShem's, Gospel Truth....

A simple truth....

Intelligence DOESN'T/DIDN'T evolve! It is inherited....

In our case; "Cain knew his Neanderthal wife"...
(G. Freeman)
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